ENGL 200
Literature in English
MW 3:20 to 4:35                                                                                                       Staff

This course introduces students to the reading of literature in the English language. Through close attention to the practice of reading, students are invited to consider some of the characteristic forms and functions imaginative literature has taken, together with some of the changes that have taken place in what and how readers read.

 ENGL 203–100
Introduction to Creative Writing   
MW 12:45 to 2:00                                                                                                 Staff                   

This course acquaints students with opportunities for creative expression across genres. The course primarily focuses on poetry and short fiction – though playwriting, screenwriting, and genres of creative nonfiction will also be explored. We will attend to those elements that make for vivid, effective writing, including relevant detail, lyrical language, and memorable images; inventive metaphor and simile; and authentic voice, setting, and characterization. Taking this course will help to further develop an understanding and practice of creativity in the medium of language and to distinguish among the creative opportunities and constraints of different literary genres.

ENGL 203–101
Introduction to Creative Writing   
TTh 11:30 to 12:45                                                                                    Staff                               

This course acquaints students with opportunities for creative expression across genres. The course primarily focuses on poetry and short fiction – though playwriting, screenwriting, and genres of creative nonfiction will also be explored. We will attend to those elements that make for vivid, effective writing, including relevant detail, lyrical language, and memorable images; inventive metaphor and simile; and authentic voice, setting, and characterization. Taking this course will help to further develop an understanding and practice of creativity in the medium of language and to distinguish among the creative opportunities and constraints of different literary genres.

ENGL 204
Introduction to Journalism
TTh 7:00 to 8:15                                                                                Staff

Students will learn the basics of reporting and writing news stories, but also the traditions behind the craft and the evolving role of journalism in society. Instruction will include interviewing skills, fact-checking, word choice and story structure–all framed by guidance on making ethically sound decisions. Assignments could include stories from a variety of beats (business, entertainment, government, science), along with deadline stories and breaking news Web updates, profiles and obituaries.

ENGL 213
Introduction to Fiction Writing
MWF 9:30 to 10:20                                                                           Staff

A beginning workshop in fiction writing, introducing such concepts as voice, point of view, plot, characterization, dialogue, description, and the like. May include discussion of literary examples, both classic and contemporary, along with student work.

ENGL 214
Introduction to Poetry Writing
TTh 2:30 to 3:45                                                                                Staff

A beginning workshop, focusing on such elements of poetry as verse-form, syntax, figures, sound, tone. May include discussion of literary examples as well as student work.

ENGL 257B
Introduction to Poetry. 
TTh 4:00 to 5:15                                                                                Marling

What is poetry and what makes it so intense? In this course we look at how form and language create a special kind of meaning for us in poetry. We will trace the formal and emotive qualities in American and English poetry as they have evolved, reading such poets as Shakespeare, Dylan Thomas, Emily Dickinson, Derek Wolcott, T.S. Elliot, William Carlos Williams, and Gwendolyn Brooks. But we will also try our hands at sonnets, haiku, and free verse.  A few short papers, a longer one on your favorite poet or genre, and faithful attendance required.

ENGL 285
Special Topics Seminar
Protest Literature
TTh 5:30 to 6:45                                                                                Jewell

From antislavery and women’s liberation movements to Black Lives Matter, protest literature in America serves a vital role in raising consciousness, promoting social justice, and bringing about change. This course begins with a focus on the long history of protest literature in America when nineteenth-century writers such as Henry David Thoreau wrote about the necessity for civil disobedience, Frederick Douglas challenged interpretations of democracy, and Rebecca Harding Davis exposed deplorable working conditions of laborers. We will trace the influence of these earlier writers on mid-twentieth-century American protest writers seeking continued legal and cultural freedoms within the Women’s, Civil Rights, Native American and Gay Liberation

Movements. We will also examine literary works associated with ongoing and contemporary social justice movements, with a strong focus on the literary forms and techniques these writers use to disrupt, dissent, and bring about change. In addition to the writers named above, we will read poetry, prose, and fiction by Seneca Falls Convention (1834) attendees, Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Evans, Lydia Sigourney, Emma Lazarus, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, John Steinbeck, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Allen Ginsberg, Tony Kushner, Philip Levine, Kenneth Patchen, Ethridge Knight, Sonia Sanchez, Allison Bechdel, and others. Students will write weekly responses, a midterm, and a final essay.

ENGL 367/467
Introduction to Film
TTh 2:30 to 3:45                                                                                Spadoni

An introduction to the art of film. Each week we’ll take an element of film form (editing, cinematography, sound, and so on) and ask how filmmakers work with this element to produce effects. Most weeks, students will watch a film on their own that the class will discuss in light of the week’s focus. Films will include masterworks of the silent era, foreign films, Hollywood studio-era classics, and more recent cinema.

Undergrads (ENGL 367) take a scheduled quiz, possible occasional unscheduled ones, and a midterm and final exam, and they write two essays (5-6 and 8-10 pages). Grad students (ENGL 467) satisfy the same requirements, but their final essay is an extended research project, in connection with which they submit a partial draft and other related documents. Engl 367 has no prerequisites and welcomes first-year students.

ENGL 368
Topics in Film
Classic American Fiction on Film 
 TTh 2:30 to 3:45                                                                               Marling

We will read novels and some short fiction by Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Scott Fitzgerald, Nathaniel West, Kurt Vonnegut, Alice Walker, James M. Cain, Toni Morrison, and Raymond Carver. Then we’ll watch the celebrated films made from their works, some of them more famous than the texts. This is a chance to read some classic authors (Steinbeck) not often taught in our surveys. And also a chance to see films not included in our conventional film classes. Paper books. Two short papers and one longer one, faithful attendance, and a vibrant presence in our Canvas discussions desired.