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Past Colloquia

Fall 2013

Friday, August 30th
“What Are You Reading?” Roundtable
Featuring Cara Byrne, Thom Dawkins, Gregory Weiss, Sarah Gridley, Megan Jewell, Gary Stonum. Moderator: Michael Clune. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 6th
“Charles Bukowski: The Accidental German.” A lecture by William Marling. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 13th
“Prophesying and ‘uncontrolled freedome’: Edmund Spenser, Archbishop Grindal, and the Episode of the Egalitarian Giant,” a lecture by Denna Iammarino. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 20th
“Antebellum American Literature in the Shadow of the Gallows.” A lecture by Paul C. Jones (Ohio University). Clark 206. 2:00 to 3:30 p.m.

Friday, September 27th
“Regional Poets on Poetry”: Frank Giampietro (Cleveland State University), Joy Katz (Chatham University–Pittsburgh), David Young (Oberlin College). Clark 206. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 4th
“Crazy Sexy Disability,” a lecture by Amanda Booher (University of Akron). Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 11th
Authorship and Exhibition Key Article Forum. Moderated by Martha Woodmansee. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 18th
“The Historical and the Metaphysical in George Oppen’s ‘Route,'” a lecture by Bob Baker (University of Montana). Clark 206. 2:00 to 3:30 p.m.

Friday, October 25th
“The Accidental Autist: Neurosensory Disorder in The Secret Agent,” a lecture by Joseph Valente (University of Buffalo). Clark 206. 2:00 to 3:30 p.m.

Friday, November 1st
“Carl Dreyer’s Corpse: Horror Film Atmosphere and Narrative,” a lecture by Robert Spadoni. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, November 8th
“‘They Speake in their Silence’: Implicit Faith and the Religion of the Creatures,” a lecture by Joanie Picciotto (University of California–Berkeley). Clark 206. 2:00 to 3:30 p.m.

Friday, November 15th.
“Old Unreliable: Character Narration, the Curse of Knowledge, and Elements of Surprise,” a lecture by Vera Tobin. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Friday, November 22
Job Market Talks. “Mediation and the Go Red Heart Disease Narrative,” a lecture by Mary Assad and “’There’s no plot, no sequence, no moral’: Boredom and Violence in the Pulp Modernism of Post Oaks and Lost Plains,” a lecture by Jason Carney. Guilford Parlor. 2:00 p.m.

Friday, December 6th
MacIntyre Event. “‘Rituals of the Ordinary’: Marilynne Robinson’s Aesthetics of Belief and Finitude,” a lecture by Ray Horton. Clark 206. 4:00 to 6:00.

Spring 2014

Friday, January 17th
“What Are You Reading?”
Roundtable Participants: Jim Sheeler, Marie Lathers, Paul Jaussen, Kristin Kondrlik, Michael Parker, and Chris Strathman. Coordinator: Megan Swihart Jewell. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, January 24th
“Performatively Speaking: Speech and Action in Antebellum American Literature,” a lecture by Debra Rosenthal (John Carroll University). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.
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Friday, January 31st
“A Queer Way of Looking at Henry James: Charles Demuth’s Illustrations to ‘The Turn of the Screw,’” a lecture by Henry Adams. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 7th
“Slipping from Secret History to Novel,” a lecture by Rachel Carnell (Cleveland State University). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 14th
“Toward a Time Ecology,” a lecture by Jesse Matz (Kenyon College). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 21st
A Poetry Reading with Jennifer Moxley (University of Maine). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 28th
“In the Beginning… There Was the Electron: Psychedelic Formalism and the Birth of Video Art at The National Center for Experiments in Television”, a lecture by Kris Paulsen (The Ohio State University). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 7th
“Decorous Whitman,” a lecture by Theo Davis (Northeastern University). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 28th
“Dr. Johnson at Prayer,” a lecture by Katherine Kickel (Miami University of Ohio). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 11th
Dickinson, the Ballad, and Nineteenth-century American Experiments in Verse Form,” a lecture by Cristanne Miller (University of Buffalo-SUNY). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 16th
“Stories from the ‘Kingdom of the Sick’,” a lecture by Ann Jurecic (Rutgers University—New Brunswick). 1914 Lounge, Thwing Center. 4:00 p.m.

Friday, April 18th
“Double Voicing and Personhood in Collaborative Life Writing about Autism: The Transformative Narrative of Carly’s Voice,” a lecture by Monica Orlando. Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Fall 2014

Friday, August 29th
“What are You Reading?” A roundtable discussion with Kristina Collins, Kate Dunning, Andrew Field, Ben Fletcher, T. Kenny Fountain, and Dave Lucas. Moderator: Michael Clune. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 5th
“Musical Stereotyping American Jewry in Early 20th Century Mass Media,” a lecture by Daniel Goldmark. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 12th
“The Emergence of African Literature and the Cold War,” a lecture by Peter Kalliney (University of Kentucky). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 19th
“’It’s not perversion. It’s variety’: Desire and Perversion in Ernest Hemingway’s The Garden of Eden,” a lecture by Joseph Cheatle. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 26th
Key Article Colloquium: Chapters 1 and 2 from Publics and Counterpublics. Moderator: William Marling. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 3rd
Alissa Nutting Reading (fiction) (John Carroll University). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 10th
“Martyr or Mimic? Dying like a Saint in Richard II,” a lecture by Maggie Vinter. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 17th
“Fictions and Petitions: Gender and Genre in Mid-Nineteenth-Century U.S. Women’s Writings,” a lecture by Amy Dunham Strand (Aquinas College). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 24th
“Wordsworth in Bed,” a lecture by Adela Pinch (University of Michigan). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 31st
Faculty Roundtable Discussion: “What is Central to English?” Michael Clune, T. Kenny Fountain, Sarah Gridley. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, November 7th
Toi Derracotte Reading (poetry) (University of Pittsburgh). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Thursday, November 13th
Aaron Kunin Reading (poetry) (Pomona College). Clark 206. 4:30 p.m.

Friday, November 14th
“The Wish to Be an Object,” a lecture by Aaron Kunin (Pomona College). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, November 21st
Job Market Talks. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, December 5th
“‘the sentient plume’: Avian Minds and the Pathetic Fallacy in Arnold, Darwin, and Ruskin,” a lecture by Eric Earnhardt. MacIntyre Event. Clark 206. 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2015

Friday, January 16th
“What Are You Reading?” A roundtable discussion with Martha Woodmansee, Erika Olbricht, Eric Earnhardt, Michelle Lyons-McFarland, Brian McLaughlin, and Sydney Pierce. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, January 23rd
Key Article Forum. Reading excerpts from Sarah Ahmed’s The Cultural Politics of Emotions. Moderator: John Higgins. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, January 30th
No colloquium.

Friday, February 6th
“Particles and Poetics,” a lecture by Wendy Hyman (Oberlin College). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 13th
A book talk and reading with Thrity Umrigar. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 20th
Medieval and Early Modern Roundtable: “Fame, Memory, and Memorialization.” Participants: Drs. Denna Iammarino, Gabrielle Parker, and Magdalena Vinter. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 27th
“The Ink Stained Wretch in the Academy: Reconsidering Service and/as Scholarship,” a lecture by Chalet Seidel (Westfield State University). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 6th
“On Not Reading David Foster Wallace,” a lecture by Amy Hungerford (Yale University). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 20th
 “Think Within the Actual,” a lecture by Chris Haufe. (Philosophy Department). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 27th
“Why Value in Art is not a Question of Morality or Politics,” a lecture by Charles Altieri (University of California—Berkeley). Senior Classroom, Tinkham Veale University Center. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 3rd
An Ecopoetics Event with Brian Teare (Temple University). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 10th
“Form, Subject, and Genre: Toward a History of Copyright for Newspaper and Magazine Writings,” a lecture by Will Slauter. (Sadar Lecture.) Moot Court (A 59) CWRU Law School. 3:00 p.m.

Monday, April 13th
“From Black Misery to Happy to be Nappy: Transformative Race & Body Politics in African American Picture Books,” a Dissertation Seminar Lecture by Cara Byrne. Clark 206. Refreshments 3:30. Lecture 4:00 p.m.

Friday, April 17th
Catherine Forsa: “A Formal – Thermal – Feeling Comes: Temperature and Feeling in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry” and Kristin Kondrlik: “‘Fellow feeling’ and Fractured Femininity: Shaping Women Physicians’ Professional Identity in Late Victorian and Edwardian Women’s Medical Magazines.” Adrian-Salomon Lectures. Clark 206. 4:00 p.m.

Fall 2015

Friday, August 28
“What Are You Reading?” A roundtable discussion with Joyce Kessler (Cleveland Institute of Art), Jim Sheeler, Brie Parkin, Marcus Mitchell, Megan Weber, and Dale Kiefer. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 4
“The Contingent Labor Crisis in Academia,” a panel discussion with Maria Maisto, Robin Sowards, Julie Gergits, and Yvonne Bruce. Clark 309. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 11
“9/11 Chronomania: Terror and the Temporal Imagination,” a Lecture by Justin Neuman (Yale). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 18
“Design and the Humanities: The Paleoteric and the Neoteric in Liberal Education,” a Lecture by Richard Buchanan (Weatherhead School). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, September 25
A Reading from Gamelife: a Memoir by Michael W. Clune. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 2
“Yes, You May Touch the Art: Haptic Technologies and Rhetorical Experience in the Digitally Interactive Museum,” a Lecture by Jessica Slentz. Bellflower 102. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 9
Poetry Reading by Terrance Hayes (University of Pittsburgh). Clark 309. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 16
“Seeing and Feeling Race: Some Problems in Recent Discourse,” a Lecture by Kenneth Warren (University of Chicago). Clark 309. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, October 30
“What Was Historicism?” a Lecture by Steven Justice (University of California—Berkeley). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, November 6
“The ‘Fresh Complications’ of Muscular Women in Victorian Sensation Fiction,” A Lecture by Marcus Mitchell. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m

Friday, November 20
A Reading by Dan Beachy-Quick (Colorado State University). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Spring 2016

Friday, January 22nd
“Cinema, Cinema Studies and the Idea of the New,” a lecture by Grace An and William Patrick Day (Oberlin College). Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 5th
“What is Rhetoric?” a Round-table Discussion with participants: Kristin Kondrlik, Jessica Slentz, Scott Weedon, and T. Kenny Fountain. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 19th
“No Ill Physicians: Jean Fernel’s Physologia and George Herbert’s Curative Poetics,” a lecture by Thom Dawkins. Zverina Room at Dittrick Museum. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, February 26th
Living Forms Round-table with participants: Jeremy Bendik-Keymer, Eric Chilton, Josh Hoeynck, Denna Iammarino, and Tom Tierney (Wooster). Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 4th
“Transfer in the Writing Classroom: Research Where You Are,” a lecture by Danielle Nielsen. Bellflower 102. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 18th
A Poetry Reading by Dave Lucas. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 25th
“”Oyster Metaphysics: Melville and the Ethics of Matter,” a lecture by Branka Arsic. Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 1st
“Mirror and Muse: Julia Margaret Cameron’s Portraits of Julia Jackson,” a lecture by Andrea Rager. Bellflower 102. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 8th
“Ecopoetics—a talk, with some poems,” a presentation by Brenda Hillman. Clark 206. 3:00 p.m.

Monday, April 11th
“Sexual Discretion: Black Masculinity and the Politics of Passing,” a Lecture by Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr. Clark 309. 4:30 p.m.

Friday, April 15th
“Current Trends in Book History,” a Lecture by Greg Barnhisel. KSL Dampeer Room. 10:00 a.m.

Friday, April 15th
“Norman Holmes Pearson: Rewriting America for a Cold War World,” a lecture by Greg Barnhisel. Bellflower 102. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 22nd
Tao Lin Reading. Clark 309. 3:00 p.m.

Friday, April 29th
Adrian-Salomon Event: Lectures by Cara Byrne and Eric Earnhardt: Byrne: “From The Snowy Day to Goggles!: The Racial Legacy of Ezra Jack Keats’ Picture Books.”
Earnhardt: “The Modern Lyric Refinery: From John Ruskin’s Iron to T. S. Eliot’s Platinum.” Bellflower 102. 3:00 p.m.

Fall 2016

Friday, September 2nd
“Why Do Works Last?” a panel discussion with participants Christopher Flint, Maggie Vinter, Martha Woodmansee. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 9th
“Is Blasphemy the Language of Modernism?” a lecture by Steve Pinkerton. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 16th
A Poetry Reading by Rowan Ricardo Phillips. Cleveland Museum of Natural History Planetarium. 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Friday, September 23rd
Translation Panel with participants Joanna Trzeciak Huss and Cristian Gomez Olivares. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 30th
“Free Speech and the Liberal Arts,” a panel discussion with participants Marilyn Mobley, Kim Emmons, and Michael W. Clune. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 7th
“Beyond Academic Writing,” a panel discussion with participants Brad Ricca, Megan Jewell, Michelle Lyons, and recent alum Julia Bianco. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 14th
“Conflicted: Big Pharma, Drug Money, and the FDA,” a lecture by Scott Graham. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 21st
A Nonfiction Reading by Kerry Howley. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 4th
“The Mind in Love: Reflections on the Universe,” a lecture by Robert Pogue Harrison. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 11th
A Poetry Reading by Li-Young Lee. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, December 2nd
Dean’s Fellow Presentation. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, December 9th
Macintyre Presentation. “Unbearable Representations: Dismembering the Sovereign in Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, a lecture by Megan Griffin. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Spring 2017

Friday, January 20th
Panel “On Style.” Rob Spadoni, Kenny Fountain, Mary Grimm. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, January 27th
 “Don’t Let It Go To Your Head,” a discussion with Laura Moriarty. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 3rd
 “Slow Fiction and Time Machines: Allegoresis and Literary Life in the Periodicals,” a lecture by Kurt Koenigsberger. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 17th
“Enjoy Your Ontology!: Object Lessons in Thoreau’s Journal,” a lecture by Mark Noble. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

March 3rd
A reading by David Giffels. Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

March 10th  
A reading by Linda Gregerson. Senior Classroom B, Tinkham Veale University Center. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

March 24th  
“Pseudoscience Fictions,” a lecture by Kate Marshall. Bellflower 102. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

March 31st
“The Anthropocenotaph: Structures of Mourning a Transforming World,” a lecture by Matt Burkhart. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

April 7th
“Case Studies in a Poetics of Memory,” a panel discussion with Lucy Biederman and Arthur Russell. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

April 14th  
“From History to Mystery: Or, How to Tell the Truth, Even When You Are lying,” a reading and discussion with Samuel Thomas. Guilford Parlor. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 21st
“Green-Screeners: Locating the Literary History of Word Processing,” a lecture by Matthew Kirschenbaum (Sadar Lecture). Clark 206. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 28th
Adrian Solomon Awards. “Cognitive Disability and Narrative in Of Mice and Men,” a lecture by Evan Chaloupka. Willa Cather’s Modernist Religion,” a lecture by Ray Horton. “Taking Rhetorical Experience and Sensation from the Museum to the Writing Classroom,” a lecture by Jessica E. Slentz. 3:00 to 4:15 p.m.

FALL 2017

Friday, September 1st
“Close Reading,” a panel discussion. Participants: Kim Emmons, Joshua Hoeynck, Maggie Vinter. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, September 8th
“Re-mapping Readerly Experience: Conceptualizing a Digital Edition of John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande (1581),” a lecture by Denna Iammarino. Bellflower 102. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, September 15th
“When Blue is Read: Literature and the Problem of Color,” a lecture by Nicholas Gaskill. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, September 22nd
“How I Found You,” John Orlock Reads from a Work-in-Progress. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, September 29th
“Literature and Politics,” a panel discussion. Participants: Michael Clune, Megan Jewell, John Higgins. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, October 6th
A Poetry Reading by Susan Stewart (from Cinder: New and Selected Poems). Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, October 20
A Fiction Reading by Lucy Biederman (from The Walmart Book of the Dead). Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, October 27th
“Individuals with Autism and the Writing Process: Two Perspective,” A Lecture by Sara Newman. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, November 3rd
“Embodying Fiction and the Limits of Literary Theory, in the Middle Ages and Beyond,” a lecture by Julie Orlemanski. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, November 17th
“Poetry in the Time of Facebook.” Panelists: Joe DeLong, Caryl Pagel, and RA Washington. Moderator: David Lucas.Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, December 8th
“Strange Encounters with Dead Selves: Medical Memoir, Apostrophe, and (Re)animating Subjectivity,” the MacIntyre lecture by Melissa Pompili. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Spring 2018

Friday, January 19
Adaptation: a Panel Discussion. Participants: Christopher Flint, James Sheeler, Martha Woodmansee. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, January 26th
“Who Reads Poetry? What Is Poetry For?” a Lecture by Don Share. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, February 2nd
“How to Do Things with Dead People: Temporal Conjecture and the Shakespearean History Play,” a Lecture by Alice Dailey. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, February 9th
“Emergent Form: The Long Poem as a Complex Adaptive System,” a Lecture by Paul Jaussen.  Senior Classroom, Tinkham Veale Center. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, February 16th
“Allegory Without Ideas: or, Realism,” a Lecture by Sandra Macpherson. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, February 23rd
“Writing Radical History: The One Man Revolution of Ammon Hennacy,” a Lecture by William Marling. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15. 

Friday, March 9th
“Finance Capital and British Modernism,” a lecture by Regina Martin. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, March 23rd
“Programmable Type: the Craft of Printing, the Craft of Code,”
a Lecture by Ryan Cordell. Sadar Lecture. Freedman Center Collaboration Commons, Kelvin Smith Library. Refreshments at 3:00, Lecture at 3:15.

Friday, March 30th
“Ima Read: American Psycho,” a lecture by Namwali Serpell. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, April 6th
“Neology, Musical Fantasy, and the Revolutionary Body Politic,” a Lecture by Fran Brittan. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, April 13th
“Tourism and Taxonomy: Natasha Trethewey’s Thrall, Marianne Moore’s ‘Virginia Britannia,’ and Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia,” a Lecture by Linda Kinnahan. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15. 

Friday, April 20th
A Reading by Zachary Mason. Freedman Center, Kelvin Smith Library. 3:15 to 4:15.

Friday, April 27th
Adrian Salomon Event. “Discipline and Anarchy: Towards a Practice of Queer Rigor,” a lecture by Michael Chiappini; “Once and/or FutureKing: Shakespeare’s Henry V,” a lecture by Megan Griffin; “The Minutia of Everyday Life: Language and Social Decorum in the private writings of Aphra Behn, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan,” a lecture by Megan Weber. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15. Refreshments at 3:00.

Fall 2018

Friday, September 7th
“Some Problems Concerning Narrators in Novels and Speakers in Poems,” a Lecture by Jonathan Culler. Senior Classroom. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 14th
“#nottheenemy: The Crucial Role of Journalists in Society,” a Lecture by Wes Lowery. Freedman Center, Kelvin Smith Library. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 21st
Roundtable: “The Way We Write Now.” Participants: Robert Rowan, Michael Clune, Kristine Kelly. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 – 4:15p.m.

Friday, September 28th
“Trans Literature: The Turn Towards Transgender Literary Theory and Narratives,” a Lecture by Gabrielle Bychowski. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 5th.
A Fiction Reading by Nick White. Guilford Parlor.  3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 12th
“Romanticism Against the Future,” a Lecture by Anne McCarthy. Bellflower 102. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 26th
A Poetry Reading by Iris Jamahl Dunkle. Bellflower 102. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 2nd
“Categorical Engagements: Innovative Women’s Writing and Writing about Writing,” a Lecture by Megan Jewell. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 9th
A Poetry Reading by Vievee Francis. Senior Classroom. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 16th
“Make Yourselves Gods: Sex, Secularism, and the Radiant Body of Early Mormonism,” a Lecture by Peter Coviello. Clark 309. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 30th
Grad Student Job Talks. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Spring 2019

Friday, January 18
“Poetic Collaboration and Competition.” Roundtable featuring Michael Clune, Josh Hoeynk  and Chanda Feldman. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 pm.

Friday, January 25
“The Miseducation of Mary Magdalene: Playing with Sin in Late Medieval England,” a lecture by Arthur Russell. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 1
“After ‘Social Justice’: Alternative Paradigms for the Humanities and Social Sciences,” a lecture by Michael Rectenwald. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 8
“Toni Morrison and the House That Race Built,” a lecture by Marilyn Mobley. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 15
Poetry Reading by Daniel Borzutsky. Senior Classroom, Tinkham Veale University Center. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 22
Fiction Reading by Salvatore Scibona. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 1     
“Staging Reconstruction in the Long Civil Rights Era,” a lecture by Julie Burrell (Cleveland State University). Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 8     
“Counter-Empiricisms: Other Human Sciences in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World,” a lecture by Greta LaFleur (Yale). Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 22   
“Why Teach Listening in an English Department?” a Lecture by Stephanie Ceraso. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 29
“Tracking Devices,” a lecture by Nan Z Da. Clark 206. 3:15 -4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 5
“What can you do with a Graduate Degree in English?” Roundtable on Alt-Ac Careers featuring CWRU graduate program alumni Miriam Goldman, Tasia Hane-Devore and David Megenhart. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 12     
“Don’t Trust Your Dictionary,” the Sadar Lecture by Jesse Sheidlower. Freedman Center, Kelvin Smith Library. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 19     
Poetry Reading by Toi Derricotte. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 26     
Adrian-Solomon Event. Recipients of the Adrian-Salomon Fellowship Discuss their Research Projects. “Misreading Influence in Walker Percy’s The Moviegoer.Philip Derbesy. “Liberty and Community in the American Slave Narrative.” Daniel Luttrull. “Feeling Divided: The Association of American Medical College’s Medical School Objectives Project and the Rhetorical Construction of the Empathy Paradigm.” Melissa Pompili. Guilford Parlor. Refreshments at 3:00. Lecture at 3:15.

Fall 2019

Friday, September 6
Roundtable on Genre (Denna Iammarino, Camila Ring, Maggie Vinter). Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 13
“Unsettled Histories: Dub Poetry and Decolonization,” a Lecture by Janet Neigh. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 20
Reading and Book Party for Maggie Vinter’s Last Acts. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, September 27
Poetry Reading and Alice Dunbar Nelson Award Ceremony honoring Carl Philips. Mandel Center 108. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 4
“International Authorship, Trans-Atlantic Publishing, and the ‘English Tolstoy,’” a Lecture by Kathy Bowrey. Dampeer Room, Kelvin Smith Library. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 18
Readings in Memory of Toni Morrison. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 25
“The Vanishing Point of Existence: Kierkegaard and the Ethics of the Novel,” the Stonum Lecture in Poetics by Yi-Ping Ong. Mandel Center 108. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 1
“Against Commercial Culture,” a Lecture by Michael Clune. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 8
Poetry Reading by Javier Zamora and Marcelo Hernandez Castillo. Senior Classroom, Tinkham Veale Center. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 15
“A World of Our Own Making: Skanky Possum Press (A Personal Genealogy),” a Lecture by Dale Smith. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 22
“It’s Not EU, It’s Me: Brexit and the new age of cultural production,” a Lecture by Luke Reader. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, December 6
“Preparing the Table: Reconstituting  Cultural Identity through Cookbooks,” a Lecture by Brita Thielen. Guilford Parlor. 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Spring 2020

Friday, January 17th
Midsommar: Thing Theory,” a Lecture by Robert Spadoni. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, January 31st
“Rocks, Caves, and Wonders on the Eighteenth-Century Stage,” a Lecture by Misty Anderson. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 7th
“The Urgency of Pleasure: Theorizing a Rhetoric of Pleasure in Contemporary Cookbooks,” a Lecture by Carrie Helms Tippen. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 14th
Graduate Student Panel: “What Are Our Grads Researching?” Panelists: Leah Davydov, Laura Evers, Joseph Spieles. Moderator: Philip Derbesy. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

 Friday, February 21st
A Poetry Reading by Jeff Gundy. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 28
“A Little Million Doors: Poetry, Art, and the Sciences of Body and Mind (An Interdisciplinary Discussion featuring Chad Sweeney.” Other panelists include Dr. Eleanor Davidson (CWRU, Bioethics – School of Medicine), Dr. Gary Deimler (CWRU, Sociology), and Camila Ring. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Fall 2020

All events are virtual.

Friday, September 4th:
English Colloquium: Virtual Reading Group: 3:15 to 4:15 pm. A discussion of the first 6 chapters of How to be an Antiracist by Ibram X.Kendi.

Friday, October 2nd
Poetry Reading: Celebrating Black Writing in Cleveland. Featured readers Michelle R. Smith and Mary Weems.  3:15 to 4:15 pm.

Friday, October 9th
Reading Group: Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Case for Reparations,” and Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Antiracist, Chap. 12. Thrity Umrigar, Facilitator. 3:15 to 4:15 pm.

Friday, October 16th
Reading Group: “Intersectionality and the Path Forward.” 3:15 to 4:15 pm.

Friday, October 30th
Reading Group: “Whiteness.” 3:15 to 4:15 pm.

Friday, November 13th
Virtual Reading Group: Ralph Ellison, “An Extravagance of Laughter.” 3:15 to 4:15 pm. Michael Clune, facilitator.

Friday, November 20th
“Time and Time Again: On the Rhetorical Work of African American Impatience,”
a Lecture by Tamika Carey. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, December 4th:
MacIntyre Award Ceremony: “Stalking Yourself: Reading Sam Shepard’s Spy of the First Person,”
a presentation by Andrew Petracca. 3:15 to 4:15.

Spring 2021

All events are virtual.

Friday, February 12th
Thinking with Technology: Intersections of Digital Pedagogy and Digital (a Roundtable). Participants: Kristine Kelly, Francesca Mancino, Arthur Russell. Moderator: Denna Iammarino. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 26th
Fundraiser for the Frederica Ward Scholarship featuring Claudia Rankine. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 12th
“Artworks and Persons,” a Lecture by Robert Lehman. 3:15 to 4:30 p.m.

Friday, March  26th
“The Gimmick as Aesthetic Judgment and Capitalist Form,” a Lecture by Sianne Ngai (The Stonum Lecture in Poetics). 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 2nd
“Case Closed,” a Presentation by Rachel Dissell and Andrea Simakis. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 9th
“Shakespeare and the Refugees,” a Lecture by Doug Lanier. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 16th
A Poetry Reading by Mary Quade. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 23rd
“Say They Name in Black English:  George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Atatiana Jefferson, Aura Rosser, Travon Martin and the Need to Move from College Writing Instruction and Toward Black Linguistic Arts,” a Lecture by Vershawn Young (The Edward S. and Melinda Sadar Lecture in Writing in the Disciplines). 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, May 7th
“Mesmeric Realism: Constructing Consciousness Through Vitalist Models,” a Lecture by Leah Davydov. The Adrian-Salomon Event. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Fall 2021

Friday, September 10th
“Literature and the Environment Roundtable.” Speakers: Matthew Burkhart, Eric Chilton and Mary Grimm. Moderator: Joshua Hoeynck. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 1st
A Reading by Cris Harris from I Have Not Loved You With My Whole Heart, a Memoir. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 8th
A Writers’ Discussion with Brad Ricca. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 15th
A Book Party/Poetry Reading with Sarah Gridley and Elsa Johnson. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 22nd
“Song in Bombay Cinema as Site for Female Self-Making and Desire,” a Lecture by Anu Needham. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, October 29th
“Radical Education: The Extraordinary Life and Death of Black Mountain College,” a Lecture by Joshua Hoeynck. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, November 12th
A Poetry Reading with Philip Metres. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, December 3rd
“Shakespeare’s Wonderful Objects,” a Lecture by Charlie Ericson (MacIntyre Event). Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Spring 2022

Friday, January 14th
A Conversation with Thrity Umrigar. Virtual. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 4th
“Staging the Woman in Ex Machina and The Tempest,” a Lecture by James Newlin. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 11th
“Erotic Poetics and Sister Songs: A Legacy of Black Women Creatives in the Black Arts Movement,” a Lecture by Loron Benton. Virtual. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 18th
“Words for Music Perhaps,” a lecture by Tom Bishop. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, February 25th
“Sweat and Steam:  Zora Neale Hurston and Willie Cole Redefine Sin,” a Lecture by Leslie Wingard. Virtual. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 4th
“Flirting with the God of War: Coquettes, Hummingbirds, and the Hemispheric,” a Lecture by Maria Windell. Virtual. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 18th
Ammon Hennacy:  How to Get Sent to Solitary for Advocating Pacifism in Ohio,” a Lecture by William Marling. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, March 25th
A Poetry Reading by George Bilgere. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 1st
“The Ubiquity of the Interview: The Story of a Lower Genre,” a Lecture by Jeff Williams. Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 8th
“Constance Fenimore Woolson: The Story of her Revival and Why the Recovery of Nineteenth-Century Women Writers Matters,” a Lecture by Anne Rioux (the Sadar Lecture). Clark 206. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 15th
“Light and Time in the Narrative Fiction Film,” a Lecture by Patrick Keating. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Friday, April 22nd
The Adrian-Salomon Event: ‘By a departing light / We see acuter, quite’: The Apophatic Imagination of Emily Dickinson,” a Lecture by Camila Ring and “’She could not get her head quiet until she had it written: then she was relieved’: Writing Against the Body in the Diary of Alice James,” a Lecture by Hayley Verdi Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Fall 2022

Friday, September 9th
“Polarization, Poetry, Prose: Why Our Work Matters Now,” a Department Panel featuring Professors Walt Hunter, Kim Emmons, William Marling. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Our collective work with books, words, and sentences happens in a country and a world marked by deep divisions and differences that can feel irreconcilable. As the new year kicks off and we return with excitement to the classroom, three CWRU English professors take a moment to reflect on why our work matters now.

Thursday-Friday, September 22nd–23rd: Jordan Castro’s visit to the Department

Thursday, September 22nd
“Stretching Time,” Workshop. Bellflower Hall, Room 102. 4:00 to 5:00 p.m.  Only 25 Participants/ Must pre-register by emailing writershouse@case.edu. Sponsored by Writers House.
Many novels take place over the course of just one day, a few hours, or less. They do this by “stretching time.” In this workshop, we’ll learn how to use time dilation as a narrative technique to achieve intensity; include digressions, rants, and tangents; explore unexpected connections in your work; and have fun. Students will be provided with passages to read in class for discussion, a writing prompt to complete during the workshop.

Friday, September 23rd
A Fiction Reading by Jordan Castro. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:30 p.m.
Jordan Castro is the author of The Novelist (Soft Skull, 2022), and two poetry books. He was the editor of New York Tyrant magazine, and lives in New Haven, CT. 

Friday, September 30th

“Apprehending Terror: Norma Cole as Poet and Translator from the French,” a Lecture by Teresa Villa-Ignacio. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
In Crosscut Universe: Writing on Writing From France (2000), Norma Cole observes: “Circumstances and events (such as two world wars and the Algerian struggle for independence), from detail to detail, date to date, are not backdrop but determining facts appearing at different local lengths, from naming to silence, testing the orders of apprehension as well as of writing.” This talk explores how facts, apprehension, and their complex relationship have shaped, on one hand, experimental French poetry since the 1960s as viewed through the lens of several of Cole’s major translations, and on the other, Cole’s own poetics. While Cole uses “apprehension” in its most common sense, to seize or grasp with the intellect, an activity of perceiving, learning, or understanding, it can also signify fear or dread. Within the orders of apprehension, then, to learn facts is to become afraid, to understand facts is to dread them: factual knowledge is terror. Since temporarily losing its self-sovereignty and collaborating with the Nazis in World War II, and permanently losing its most precious colony in the Algerian War of Independence, French consciousness has itself been terrorized by the human potential to perpetrate terror to nationalist ends. The texts Cole has translated value formal innovation as a poetic response to historical change, and seek out modes of living with the history and facticity of terror. Cole’s own poetics evinces similar commitments, informed at once by her decades-long relationship to French poetry and by her situatedness in North America and on our increasingly globalized planet.

Teresa Villa-Ignacio is Associate Professor of French Translation at Kent State University. Her essays, which have appeared in the PMLA, Yale French Studies, Contemporary Literature, MLN, and the Journal of North African Literature, explore contemporary poetic and translational interventions in ethical philosophy, postcolonial liberation movements, and social justice activism. She is the co-editor of Souffles-Anfas: A Critical Anthology from the Moroccan Journal of Culture and Politics (Stanford University Press, 2016) and Traduire le Maghreb/Translating the Maghreb, a special issue of Expressions Maghrébines (Summer 2016), and the co-translator of the Algerian writer Hocine Tandajoui’s Clamor (Litmus Press, 2021). At present she is completing a book manuscript entitled “Translational Poethics: Postlyric French-American Communities Since World War II” and translating Anne-Marie Albiach’s posthumous novel La Mezzanine.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

Friday, October 7th

“Looking into Elizabeth Bishop,” a Lecture by Johanna Winant. Bellflower Hall, Room 102. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Elizabeth Bishop is celebrated for her descriptions; this talk recasts her “famous eye” not as sight but as attempts at insight, and specifically as the kind of reasoning that philosophy calls inference to the best explanation. We can then see that she’s attending to how things look in order to tell us how they work and what the criteria are for reasoning successfully.

Johanna Winant is assistant professor of English at West Virginia University. She is completing a book titled Lyric Logic: Modern American Poetry and Reasoning. Her writing appears in JML,Poetics Today,Paideuma,James Joyce Quarterly, Post45 Contemporaries, Slate,and elsewhere.

Friday, October 14th

“On the James Joyce Collection at Buffalo,” a Lecture by Jim Maynard. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
The University at Buffalo Poetry Collection is the library of record for 20th– and 21st-century poetry in English and houses the UB James Joyce Collection, the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of manuscripts and other materials by and about the renowned Irish author. This talk by Curator James Maynard provides an introduction to the Poetry Collection with a special focus on the history and holdings of the Buffalo Joyce Collection. Given that 2022 is the 100th anniversary of Ulysses, topics will include how the collection first made its way to Buffalo more than 70 years ago and our plans for the future of the UB James Joyce Collection.

James Maynard is Curator of the Poetry Collection of the University Libraries, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York. He has published widely on and edited a number of collections relating to the poet Robert Duncan, including Ground Work: Before the War/In the Dark (2006), (Re:)Working the Ground: Essays on the Late Writings of Robert Duncan (2011), Robert Duncan and the Pragmatist Sublime (2018), and No Hierarchy of the Lovely: Ten Uncollected Essays and Other Prose 1939–1981 (2020). His edition of Robert Duncan: Collected Essays and Other Prose (2014) received the Poetry Foundation’s Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism. In 2009 he helped organize the exhibition Discovering James Joyce: The University at Buffalo Collection and edited the exhibition catalogue of the same title. He was a 2020-2021 Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program Fellow and a recipient of the 2021 SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service. https://library.buffalo.edu/staff/jmaynard

Co-sponsored with Kelvin Smith Library Special Collections.

Friday, October 28th: Andrew Zawacki’s visit to the Department

“Tanka Walking,” A Workshop with Andrew Zawacki. Bellflower Hall, Room 102. 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Only 25 Participants/ Must pre-register by emailing writershouse@case.edu. Co-sponsored with the Cleveland Institute of Art and Writers House.
For this workshop, participants will set out on a walk (or several) and write about (if not during) walking. Students will also read brief selections from L.A poet Harryette Mullen’s Urban Tumbleweed: Notes from a Tanka Diary, so that when writing about their walk, they can record their reflections and observations, ideas and associations, using Mullen’s tanka form—a three-line poem with a strict syllable count. Once we’re gathered together as a workshop, then, we will discuss these exercises and offer suggestions for revision.

“These Late Eclipses / The Strickenfield Images,” a Lecture by Andrew Zawacki. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

Andrew Zawacki is the author of five poetry books: Unsun : f/11 (Coach House, 2019), Videotape (Counterpath, 2013), Petals of Zero Petals of One (Talisman House, 2009), Anabranch (Wesleyan, 2004), and By Reason of Breakings (Georgia, 2002). His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New Republic, The Nation, and other international journals, as well as the anthologies The Eloquent Poem, Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century, Walt Whitman hom(m)age, The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries, and Great American Prose Poems: From Poe to the Present. In addition, he has published four books in France. His translation of Sébastien Smirou’s My Lorenzo received a French Voices Grant, and his translation of Smirou’s See About earned an NEA Translation Fellowship and a fellowship from the Centre National du Livre. A former fellow of the Slovenian Writers’ Association, he edited Afterwards: Slovenian Writing 1945-1995 and edited and co-translated Aleš Debeljak’s Without Anesthesia: New and Selected Poems. Coeditor of the international journal Verse from 1995 through 2019, he coedited The Verse Book of Interviews as well as Gustaf Sobin’s collected poems. A 2016 Howard Foundation Fellow in Poetry, he is Distinguished Research Professor of English at the University of Georgia.

Friday, November 4th

A Poetry Reading by Divya Victor. Clark 309. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Divya Victor is the author of CURB  from Nightboat Books. CURB is the winner of the 2022 PEN America Open Book Award and the winner of the 2022 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. It was also a finalist for the 2022 CLMP Firecracker Award (Poetry). She is also the author of  KITH (Fence Books/ Book*hug); Scheingleichheit: Drei Essays (Merve Verlag, trans. Lena Schmidt); NATURAL SUBJECTS (Trembling Pillow), UNSUB (Insert Blanc), THINGS TO DO WITH YOUR MOUTH (Les Figues). Her work has been collected in numerous venues, including BOMB, the New Museum’s The Animated Reader, Crux: Journal of Conceptual Writing, The Best American Experimental Writing, POETRY, The Yale Review, American Poetry Review, and boundary2.

Her work has been translated into French, German, Spanish, and Czech. She has been a Mark Diamond Research Fellow at the U.S Holocaust Memorial Museum, a Riverrun Fellow at the Archive for New Poetry at University of California San Diego, and a Writer in Residence at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibition (L.A.C.E.). Her work has been performed or installed at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA) Los Angeles, The National Gallery of Singapore, the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibition (L.A.C.E.) and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

She has been an editor at Jacket2 (United States), Ethos Books (Singapore), Invisible Publishing (Canada) and Book*hug Press (Canada). She is currently an Associate Professor of English and Writing at Michigan State University, where she is the Director of the Creative Writing Program.

Supported by the Helen Buchman Sharnoff Endowed Fund for Poetry. (Photo by Hannah Ensor )

Friday, November 11th

A Poetry Reading with Robin Beth Schaer. Guilford Parlor. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Robin Beth Schaer is a poet and essayist whose research and teaching interests include hybrid forms, contemporary poetry, environmental writing, documentary poetics, gender & sexuality studies, global literature, and Jewish studies. She is the author of the poetry collection Shipbreaking (Anhinga 2015) and a work in progress on art and atrocity. Her recent awards include the Creative Capital Award Shortlist in 2022, a Creative Writing Fellowship from The National Endowment for the Arts in 2021, and an Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Award in 2020. She has received fellowships from Yaddo, MacDowell Colony, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Saltonstall Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Paris Review,and Guernica, among others. Schaer was educated at Colgate University and Columbia University’s School of the Arts. She has taught writing in New York, New Jersey, and Ohio, and she worked as a deckhand aboard the Tall Ship Bounty, a 180-foot ship lost in Hurricane Sandy.

Friday, November 18th

“Wayzgoose at the Writers House: A Fall Showcase of Our Letterpress Offerings.”
Bellflower Hall, First Floor.  3:15 to 4:15 p.m.

April Baker-Bell’s visit to the Department–Friday, December 2nd

“From Theory to Praxis: Implementing Linguistic Justice in the Classroom,” a Workshop with April Baker-Bell. Location TBA. 10:00 to 11:30. Only 25 Participants/ Must pre-register by emailing writershouse@case.edu.
In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to engage in more intimate conversations about Anti-Black Linguistic Racism and how they can implement Antiracist Language Pedagogies in their respective courses. Participants will also have opportunities to ask specific questions about their teaching philosophies of language, language policies, curriculum, practices, syllabi, writing assignments, etc. Baker-Bell will share sample syllabi, assignments, and activities.

“Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy,” the Sadar Lecture by April Baker-Bell. Location TBA. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. Reception following.
In this talk, Dr. April Baker-Bell will discuss how anti-Black linguistic racism and white linguistic supremacy get normalized in teacher attitudes, curriculum and instruction, pedagogical approaches, disciplinary discourses, and research, and she will discuss the impact these decisions have on Black students’ language education and their linguistic, racial, and intellectual identities. Dr. Baker-Bell will introduce a new way forward through Antiracist Black Language Pedagogy, a pedagogical approach that intentionally and unapologetically places Black Language at the center to critically interrogate white linguistic hegemony and anti-Black linguistic racism.
 
April Baker-Bell is an award-winning transdisciplinary teacher-researcher-activist and associate professor of language, literacy, and English education in the Department of English and Department of African American and African Studies at Michigan State University. Baker-Bell is an international leader in conversations on Black Language education, and her research interrogates the intersections of Black Language and literacies, anti-Black racism, and antiracist pedagogies. Her award-winning book, Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy, brings together theory, research, and practice to dismantle Anti-Black Linguistic Racism (a term Baker-Bell coined) and white linguistic supremacy. Baker-Bell’s latest research project involves collaborating with healthcare scholars and researchers to develop, implement and study antiracist medical curriculum interventions that support medical professionals with developing an antiracist praxis for confronting and reducing racial bias and anti-Black racism in medical and healthcare institutions. Baker-Bell is the recipient of many awards and fellowships, including the 2021 Coalition for Community Writing Outstanding Book Award, the 2021 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s New Directions Fellowship, the 2021 Michigan State University’s Community Engagement Scholarship Award and the 2021 Distinguished Partnership Award for Community-Engaged Creative Activity, the 2020 NCTE George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language, the 2020 Theory Into Practice Article of the Year Award, the 2019 Michigan State University Alumni Award for Innovation & Leadership in Teaching and Learning, and the 2018 AERA Language and Social Processes Early Career Scholar Award.

This is the Edward S. Sadar, MD, and Melinda Melton Sadar Lecture in Writing Across the Disciplines.

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